National Arborists

Homeowner Information

Find a Tree Service

What is an ISA Certified Arborist?

Protecting Trees During Construction

Organic Tree Care Information

Shop our Tree Care Supply Store

Information for Tree Services & Arborists

Arborist Training Information & Certification Programs

Advertise your Tree Service Company on this site.

eBooks.com Bestsellers 

Trees

Trees: A Visual Guide

The Life and Love of Trees

The Life and Love of Trees

The Sibley Guide to Trees

The Sibley Guide to Trees

 

 

National Arborists
Your online resource for local tree service companies & tree care information.

National Arborists on Facebook National Arborists Google+ National Arborists on YouTube National Arborists on Twitter
Pecan Tree
Home  > Tree Identification  > Pecan Tree

Pecan

Carya illinoinensis

Pecan trees, which are a kind of hickory, produce one of the most delicious nuts of any nut tree. More than 100 varieties of Pecan have been cultivated. Texas and Georgia are the largest producers of commercial pecans in the United States. 
The Pecan can also be planted as an ornamental, but two Pecan trees need to be planted to assure pollination. In open settings a Pecan, which has a slow to moderate growth rate, will form a broad, rounded crown. Pecan trees grow best in full sun and should be planted in moist, well-drained, loamy soil.
The compound leaves of the Pecan range from 12 - 20” in length. The number of leaflets per leaf can range from 9 - 17, but will always be an odd number. Individual leaflets may be 3 - 7” long and 1 - 2” wide, sharply pointed at the tip, rounded or wedge-shaped at the base, and sharply toothed on the margins.
Pecan nuts form in clusters of 3 - 12. Noted for their flavor, the nuts are contained in thin-shelled, dark-brown husks with 4 ribs.

The bark of Pecan trees is light brown to grayish-brown with scaly ridges separated by narrow fissures.

Pecan trees are tolerant of the alkaline soils of Arizona and New Mexico, but will require supplemental fertilization in these areas.

The original range of the Pecan extended from Southern Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa southward to western Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas.  Crop trees can now be found throughout the southern U. S., north to Virginia, and in California, and Oregon.

Pecan tree characteristics:

Common disease pests of Pecan: Scab.

Fall foliage: Yellow to brown.

Form: In open settings it will form a broad, rounded crown.

Fruit: Pecan nuts form in clusters of 3 - 12. The nuts are contained in thin-shelled, dark-brown husks with 4 ribs.

Growth Rate: Slow to moderate.

Leaves: Compound leaves 12 - 20" in length. The number of leaflets per leaf can range from 9 - 17, but will always be an odd number. Each leaflet may reach 7" in length.

Mature height: 100 - 140’.

Preferred soil pH: 4.5 - 7.5

Summer foliage: The upper surface of Pecan leaves are a dark yellowish-green, while the underside is paler and often slightly hairy.

Tree Bark: Light brown to grayish-brown. Scaly ridges separated by narrow fissures.

USDA Hardiness Zone: 5 - 9.


 

 

Official PayPal Seal 

 

[Home] [Contact Us] [Terms of Service] [Privacy Policy] [About Us] [sitemap]

Copyright  2014  Crosscut Marketing Services LLC